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Fair Trade Music Logo

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Bands are small businesses -- name your brand carefully!

Bands are small businesses -- name your brand carefully!

Look, Fair Trade Music is about helping musicians make better music by getting them at least a minimum wage. We're not here to save these miserable turds!  Raising the minimum to something above zero minus expenses does not preclude a meritocracy --  It's still up to venues to hire acts they think will make good business partners. Bands still have to do half of the promotion and entertain the crowd, keeping them there dancing, drinking, and wanting to come back.  If the band's good enough to hire, they're good enough to get a minmium wage. If they do their job well, they're worth more. 

Eating Music

Eating Music

Since this isn't actually possible, make sure you are getting paid enough to put real food on your table. You - and the other musicians in your market - will be better off for it.  

Ba-dum.. flush!

Ba-dum.. flush!

Club musicians often work for zero guarantees, promote shows on their own time and their own dime,  and work other jobs as well. As a result, many musicians become expert in making the most of the limited time and space resources.   This guy even has his own budget definition for the term 'Drum throne!"

Art and Music Require Preparation

Art and Music Require Preparation

"Music is a day job."  According to a poll we did a few years back, musicians spend about three hours in preparation (not to mention travel, load-in, load-out, setup, teardown, promotion, and marketing) for every hour they spend on stage.  Performing is a service that involves preparation and expensesThere's no reason that service should be free. 

Musicians:

Musicians:

What do you think you're doing? 

Metal Detector

Metal Detector

I'm not sure this requires explanation. 

Show in News Feed

Show in News Feed

Do you like us? Would you like to see our posts? 

In order to create advertising sales, Facebook recently started using fancy language and fancy programming to ensure that only about 15% of posts are actually seen by the people that 'like' that page.  That's a bummer, becuase we think our posts are pretty great!

If you agree, please go to our page, hover over the "like" button, and click "Show in news feed."  

(click 'get notifications' if you REALLY like us)

Thanks! 

Exposure Kat 1

Exposure Kat 1

from 'four things every musician's gotta know' #4: “Exposure” kills.It’s no coincidence that this term refers to what kills you in bad weather. Although genuinely valuable exposure opportunities show up, they’re quite rare. “Exposure” is almost always offered as a feeble excuse to try to get naive performers to work for low or no compensation, based on the mere chance of an intangible commodity of dubious real value. The term is so common that booking agents will tout their venue’s excellent exposure opportunity, yet tell you (in the same breath!) that the place has no built in draw and you'll have to bring your own following.  

We are all somebody

We are all somebody

We get this all the time: "Yeah, our band got screwed again last weekend.  Fair Trade Music?! Great idea brah. Let me know when you're done fixing things for me." Nope. Musicians are mired in a red sea of societal values.  We're not Moses... we're not even Chuck Heston. We're just the folks handing out buckets, and if we want to fix the current zero-minus-expenses, race to the bottom status quo, we all need to start bailing. In other words, we're all somebody.  Now do something!  You can start by signing up as an endorser here, and please be sure to check 'go to the next level.'  

Exposure Kills #2

Exposure Kills #2

Remember folks, Exposure can kill or find you on the wrong side of the law!  From "Four things every musician's gotta know:"  #4: Exposure kills.It's no coincidence that the overused term 'Exposure' refers to what kills you in bad weather - it's generally used to get artists to work for low or no compensation, under the shady  premise that there's a chance someone might see them that might give them some real work, or, worse yet, "Make them famous."  Booking agents will freely tout their venue's excellent exposure opportunity, yet tell you (in the same breath even!) that there's no built-in draw.  They don't even realize they're suggesting you'll get new fans, plus famous, by performing to an audience that you bring. 

Can't Afford Gas

Can't Afford Gas

Most music fans see musicians on stage "having a good time," but they don't see that being an entertainer isn't usually entertaining, hence the slogan "Music is a day job."  According to a poll we did a few years back, musicians spend about three hours in preparation (not to mention travel, load-in, load-out, setup, teardown, promotion, and marketing) for every hour they spend on stage.  Performing is a service that involves preparation and expenses. There's no reason those services should be free. 

Only if U organizez

Only if U organizez

U can, kitteh, if u workz w/ Fair Trade Musik 4 positive change "LOL" 

Yeah Brah, come and "Jam."

Yeah Brah, come and "Jam."

Ironically, it tends to only work on drummers. I'm sure this fits in to the "Should I Quit My Band" flow chart somewhere. 

Money for New Instruments

Money for New Instruments

Fans tend to forget how expensive gear is, and musicians apparently like buying it so much that they forget to figure the cost of amps, strings, cables, repairs, drums, heads, cymbals, mics, cases, effects, stands, etc. etc. into their overhead costs.  

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